Confident or Arrogant???

Archie Lee
Archie Lee is a diverse author who strives for personal excellence through a commitment to volunteerism in his community, helping it to achieve its full ethnic, health, political and social potential. Archie Lee graduated from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff in 2005 with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and a commission in the U.S. Army. An active member of the Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity since 2006, he also earned a Masters Degree in Management in 2009. Archie Lee is a strong advocate in social psychology. As a relationship expert and youth counselor, he loves social interaction and identifying character traits with people in general, primarily studying human social interaction.
Leadership

Jul 11,2018

There’s a fine line between confidence and arrogance. This is especially true given both entail a strong belief in one’s own abilities. When it comes to the responses they provoke, however, that’s where the similarities end.

Confidence gets hired; arrogance is shown the door. Building confidence takes work; arrogance is simple. In fact, it’s easy to come off as arrogant. Avoid these 6 behaviors so you don’t leave the impression of being a Class-A jerk people would rather avoid instead of the confident leader they want to follow.

1. Avoid eye contact

Arrogant people could care less about others. They’re only interested in themselves. The arrogant person will constantly be looking past you for someone else to talk to — someone they think will benefit them more than you. Confident leaders look you in the eye and make you feel as though you’re the most important person in the room.

2. Arrive consistently late to meetings and don’t apologize

Arrogant people think their time is more important than anybody else’s. Being late means nothing to them. Confident leaders are timely and quick to apologize when they’re off schedule.

3. Use condescending phrases and put-downs

Some well-known business leaders have been known to put down others with phrases like “that’s stupid” or “you’re a bozo.” These particular leaders are supremely confident, of course, but they’ve crossed the line into arrogance. I worked for an executive who routinely demeaned his employees and colleagues. Before long there was a massive brain drain from his section. He was bright; ambitious; and yes, confident. But his arrogance turned so many people off that he lost the loyalty of his team (and ultimately his position).

4. Strut or swagger when you walk into a room

The best way to describe arrogant body language is “dominating.” Examples include pointing a finger at someone’s chest, hands on hips or waving someone off with a flick of the finger. Confidence is open and less intimidating.

5. Interrupt conversations frequently

Since arrogant people are only concerned about themselves, they’re not really listening to you. Not only are they always on the lookout for someone else to talk to, they interrupt the conversation frequently.

6. Always one-up the other person

The other day I was speaking to someone who has a reputation for arrogance, and I noticed a common theme in his conversation with me — he always tried to one-up everything I said. For example, when the conversation turned to a documentary that I had recently seen on sharks, this man said, “That’s nothing, I swim with sharks.” This trait in arrogant people is so common that the famous Dilbert cartoon strip has a recurring character named “Topper.” Confident people don’t feel the need to brag. Their accomplishments do it for them.

Some business leaders are unquestionably arrogant — people about whom you may have heard or for whom you work. But the vast majority of inspiring leaders are confident, not arrogant. Be a leader people want to follow and not one people would rather avoid.

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